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How to Choose a fantastic dog breeder

How to Choose a Breeder for you and your family. 

 

We've put together a handy list of hints and tips for choosing your puppy from a reputable, responsible breeder. In this guide, we'll share with you how to spot a possible puppy farm, what questions you should be asking and choosing the right puppy for you and your lifestyle.

Responsible breeders

When contacting a breeder, they should spend time chatting with you on the phone or via email.

They should be happy to answer your questions about the mother, father, and pup's health. They should also ask you various questions to ensure you can provide the best care possible.

The breeder will then advise you on an appropriate time and date for you and them to meet up. You'll then be able to go over for a visit to get an idea of where the litter of puppies were born and raised. When visiting, the puppies; mother and siblings should be present, and the breeder should be

more than willing to have more than one meeting with you to ensure you and the puppy are compatible and will answer all your questions. The breeder must provide genuine paperwork (preferably originals) for all puppies. Vaccinations, microchipping (Since 6 April 2016, in England, Scotland and Wales, all dogs must be chipped), worming and results for health tests, and the health checks carried out on the pup's parents.

The breeder should also be able to show you their LA (Local Authority) number. This number should be shown in cases where they are breeding or selling dogs as a business.

 A breeder should never rush or force you into parting with any form of payment in exchange for a

puppy; you should feel comfortable with the commitment, and the breeder is trustworthy and honest with you as you should be with them. 

Breeders should be able to show you the mother is present when you visit. If mum isn't there, maybe the pup wasn't bred there. Be wary of explanations, such as she is at the vet's or on a walk. No professional breeder should be offering to deliver any puppy or meet you in a random place, like a car park, layby etc. If you are lucky, you should see the puppy's natural home environment with the rest of the litter and mum and dad. If not, the paperwork with health details is enough. 

If you have health concerns or issues, ask the breeder, and be careful of responses like, it's typical for the breed. The breeder should always have the relevant documents for health checks, fleas, worming or vaccinations. A kennel club registration (or parent's KC registration) is not a substitute or guarantee of the health and wellness of the puppies.Tips for spotting a happy, healthy puppy 

While viewing the litter, you must ensure that the puppies you choose are from a good home and in good general health &; well-being. A responsible, reputable breeder should not and will not sell any puppies with health concerns. The breeder should provide proof of health checks carried out by registered veterinarians upon request.

However, problems could always arise after check-ups, so you should look out for the following.

 

The puppy contract

Once happy you have found the right breeder and then have chosen a happy, healthy puppy, a good breeder should be able to provide you with a PIP (puppy information pack). The breeder should also provide a written contract in any case of a sale and purchase of a puppy. Remember, if something doesn't; feel right, it probably isn't.

Don't take and pay for a puppy if you think something isn't right. Instead, leave saying you need to consider. Please take all the breeder's details and report to the authorities. By buying from illegal breeders, you're helping to grow a booming puppy farm business. 

No professional breeder should offer to deliver a puppy or meet you in a random place, like a car park, layby etc. If you are lucky, you should see the puppy's natural home environment with the rest

of the litter and mum and dad. If not, the paperwork with health details is enough. If you have health concerns or issues, ask the breeder, and be careful of responses like, it's typical for the breed. The breeder should always have the relevant documents for health checks, fleas, worming or vaccinations. A kennel club registration (or parent's KC registration) is not a substitute or guarantee of the health and wellness of the puppies.

Tips for spotting a happy, healthy puppy While viewing the litter, you must ensure that the puppies you choose are from a good home and in good general health &; well-being. A responsible, reputable breeder should not and will not sell any puppies with health concerns. The breeder should provide proof of health checks carried out by registered veterinarians upon request.

However, problems could always arise after check-ups, so you should look out for the following

health issues:

Eyes should be clean and clear with no redness, dirt, or sleep.Ears should also be clean with no smells (this can mean infections or mites).The nose should have wide open nostrils and be slightly wet and cold. An excessively runny nose could mean they have a fever or temperature. 

Breathing should be effortless and quiet, with no coughing, grunting, wheezing or snoring. The skin should be clean and dry, with no sores look for soft fur with no fleas, ticks or other parasites; the puppies bottom shall be clean and dry under the base of the tail.The mouth should be clean with white teeth and healthy coloured pink gum lines.

The chosen puppy you are interested in should be active and friendly. Have a look to see if they are

huddled in the corner or are up and about playing with litter mates. Potential owners should not

take a puppy that appears scared or anxious; there is a possibility that they lack the social skills and

confidence it will need in later life. You may experience behavioural issues later in life, along with

other health issues. Remember, you only want to take a healthy and happy puppy. 

The puppy contract

Once happy you have found the right breeder and then have chosen a happy, healthy puppy, a good

breeder should be able to provide you with a PIP (puppy information pack). The breeder should also provide a written contract in any case of a sale and purchase of a puppy.

Remember, if something doesn't; feel right, it probably isn't. Don't take and pay for a puppy if you think something isn't right. Instead, leave saying you need to consider. Please take all the breeder's details and report to the authorities. By buying from illegal breeders, you're helping to grow a booming puppy farm business. 

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